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The first Somali cats appeared in the litters of Abyssinians as long-haired kittens. In the 1940s a British breeder named Janet Robertson exported some Abyssinian kittens to Australia, New Zealand and North America. Descendants of these cats occasionally produced kittens with long or fuzzy coats. In 1963, Mary Mailing, a breeder from Canada, entered one into a local pet show. Ken McGill, the show's judge, asked for one for breeding purposes.

An American Abyssinian breeder Evelyn Mague, also received longhairs from her cats, which she named "Somalis". Don Richings, another Canadian breeder, used kittens from McGill, and began to work with Mague. The first Somali recognized as such by a fancier organization was Mayling Tutsuta, one of McGill's cats. As of the late 1970s, the Somali was fully accepted in North America. The new breed was accepted in Europe in the 1980s. By 1991, the breed was broadly (though not universally) accepted internationally.

id="Appearance">Appearance


Somali cat

Colors and patterns

The usual or ruddy Somali is golden brown ticked with black. There are 28 colours of Somali in total although certain organisations accept only some of these colours. All organisations that register Somalis permit usual (also known as ruddy), sorrel (a.k.a. red), blue, and fawn. Most clubs also recognise usual/ruddy silver, sorrel/red silver, blue silver, and fawn silver. Other colours that may be accepted by some registries include chocolate, lilac, red, cream, usual-tortie, sorrel-tortie, blue-tortie, fawn-tortie, chocolate-tortie, lilac-tortie, and silver variants of these (e.g. blue-tortie silver).

References



  • Edwards, Alan (2005) [1999]. The Ultimate Encyclopedia of Cats Cat Breeds & Cat Care. Trevor Turner (Consultant) John Daniels (Photographer). London: Hermes House. ISBN 9780754812777. OCLC 76934417. 

External links



  • Cat Fanciers Association -- Somali
  • The International Cat Association -- Somali
  • Somali cat club of Great Britain

Somali cat

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